Where can a new rider gain skills?

General discussion of any issues that vaguely or not so vaguely relate to stuff about things that concern riding.

Moderator: BAM Moderators

Re: Where can a new rider gain skills?

Postby Evel Knievel » Mon Dec 14, 2009 12:58 pm

No it certainly isn't rocket science Nick, but you'd be surprised with the amount of nonsense that comes out of some people when trying to "teach" it. As Horse mentioned earlier, I'd be concerned about trying to do much on road before first sorting out these basic control issues.
Too much "Oh sh!t" = Not enough "What if?"
User avatar
Evel Knievel
 
Posts: 1038
Joined: Sun Dec 10, 2006 5:14 pm
Location: Bristol, UK

Re: Where can a new rider gain skills?

Postby ozzzie » Mon Dec 14, 2009 1:16 pm

Horse wrote:
Evel Knievel wrote: Countersteering should only be "taught" by a qualified instructor.


Which qualification do you have in mind?


I'm sure Iain didn't intentionally imply that we're all a bunch of twits and not up to coaching people on counter steering. He's not that arrogant.
Oz.
Site Admin
Image

Warning: Postings may contain traces of irony or sarcasm.
User avatar
ozzzie
Site Admin
 
Posts: 2255
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 1:00 am
Location: Willy Bridge

Re: Where can a new rider gain skills?

Postby Evel Knievel » Mon Dec 14, 2009 1:34 pm

ozzzie wrote:I'm sure Iain didn't intentionally imply that we're all a bunch of twits and not up to coaching people on counter steering. He's not that arrogant.


Nick asked for options and I've provided some. My comment regarding counter-steering was merely to point out that it's not something he should be trying to deal with whilst out on a ride with his mate. The responses I've had to it have been quite interesting though :twisted:
Too much "Oh sh!t" = Not enough "What if?"
User avatar
Evel Knievel
 
Posts: 1038
Joined: Sun Dec 10, 2006 5:14 pm
Location: Bristol, UK

Re: Where can a new rider gain skills?

Postby miss fliss » Mon Dec 14, 2009 4:09 pm

just to reinforce the point here Nick, yes do sign him up for SfL (or try to).
I did my SfL course six months after passing my (A2) DSA test. Had done six months riding in the interim, 5-6000 miles.
When I passed my DSA test Billy said something really encouraging and which I think it is useful to quote (if you don't mind Billy), which was to the effect that getting someone on to the training soon after a DSA test can be really good, because they don't have too much time to develop bad habits in the first place. Pass the DSA test, get a bike, do enough miles on it to have got used to the bike, and then straight on to the advanced course.

This does mean that they have less experience and may have some dippy habits, but it also means the dippy habits are less deeply ingrained. We have trained people as young as 18 for their advanced test - they didn't have years of experience behind them!
Fliss
miss fliss
 
Posts: 212
Joined: Sat Apr 01, 2006 1:06 pm
Location: little stoke

Re: Where can a new rider gain skills?

Postby tfdodo » Mon Dec 14, 2009 10:02 pm

Evel, no attempt at a dig at you. But the DSA have been a little eccentric in attitudes to counter-steering at times in their illustrious history.
Fliss - agree, and in fact the same applies to most basic bike control issues - the road is an unforgiving teaching environment - if there are fundamentally dangerous issues* then the onus is on us to recognise them, and either change approach, tailor or curtail teh ride as appropriate, Pretty Darn Quick :evil: :shock:

inability to turn corners probably qualifies. Except in Arizona :)
Rubber side down,
Nick A (SO-Team B)

"In a perfect world the future wouldn't make a dent..."

Balance Safety and Joy
User avatar
tfdodo
 
Posts: 1186
Joined: Fri Mar 31, 2006 4:51 pm
Location: Brizzel

Re: Where can a new rider gain skills?

Postby Horse » Mon Dec 14, 2009 11:43 pm

tfdodo wrote: inability to turn corners probably qualifies. Except in Arizona :)


Bikes don't do 'straight lines' anyway - it's always a series of weave/curves ;)

FWIW I started contacting DSA about including counter-steering in CBT in 1991 (no DAS yet then)!

I'd summarise the important knowledge as:
Press-Go
Quick press = quick steer
Maintain pressure until required lean angle achieved

There's a bit more, but that's all someone needs to know.
I assert my author rights: Copyright Design Patent Act 1988 may be quoted in Chain Link posts, but contacted for written consent before any other use/storage/transmission/recording

Argue with me: http://the-ride-info.blogspot.com
Horse
 
Posts: 410
Joined: Thu Dec 13, 2007 8:28 pm

Re: Where can a new rider gain skills?

Postby nickpashley » Sun Dec 27, 2009 9:56 pm

I honestly think he needs some push-bike time to learn how two wheeled machines turn...

The closest thing he has come to a push-bike is in a Spinning session at Nuffield Gym on Park Street :lol:

IMHO the 5 day crash course and test pass should be banned...
User avatar
nickpashley
 
Posts: 85
Joined: Thu Sep 18, 2008 9:12 pm

Re: Where can a new rider gain skills?

Postby Horse » Wed Dec 30, 2009 6:27 pm

nickpashley wrote: IMHO the 5 day crash course and test pass should be banned...


Sounds like the description was perfect. ;)
I assert my author rights: Copyright Design Patent Act 1988 may be quoted in Chain Link posts, but contacted for written consent before any other use/storage/transmission/recording

Argue with me: http://the-ride-info.blogspot.com
Horse
 
Posts: 410
Joined: Thu Dec 13, 2007 8:28 pm

Previous

Return to Advanced Riding Issues

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests

cron